New criminal procedure Volume 3; or, New commentaries on the

Format: Paperback

Language: English

Format: PDF / Kindle / ePub

Size: 13.68 MB

Downloadable formats: PDF

On a plain reading of ss.14 and 15, the sections do not express a standard for the degree of relevance, so that if the evidence shows a particular state of mind or body or bodily feeling under s.14 or intention or knowledge under s.15, it will be admissible as a matter of law irrespective of its probative force. Statistics published by Google, which “primarily cover requests in criminal matters,” 19 show that the number of Google user data requests received from government authorities in the United States increased more than 40 percent from 2009 to 2011. 20 Moreover, the prevalence of social media evidence in criminal proceedings will continue to proliferate as government agencies continue to formally train their personnel to search for and collect social media evidence.

A treatise on the law of criminal evidence: including the

Format: Paperback

Language: English

Format: PDF / Kindle / ePub

Size: 10.04 MB

Downloadable formats: PDF

In a murder case, intent may be inferred from the killing itself. The Case of the Death Penalty (October 2006). It thus can’t be extended. does not include an operation to remove an object. Crime Scene and Evidence Photography is also a helpful resource for students and others interested in entering into the field of crime scene investigation. Sec. 132 - Accomplice is competent witness against accused. Aberystwyth Law School has its own Legal Practice Centre , so we can offer you the opportunity to complete your solicitor training with us.

Practical Instruction for Detectives

Format: Print Length

Language: English

Format: PDF / Kindle / ePub

Size: 5.89 MB

Downloadable formats: PDF

Under him there are procureurs-generaux attached to each of the courts of appeal, of which in France there are twentysix, and under each of these subordinate procureurs there are procureurs (prosecutors) of a lesser degree. Jeffery � Regarding the rapes�what is the liability, if any, of the cheering customers, non-cheering customers, and the bartender?� Does the bartender have a legal duty to act to prevent the rape?� The bartender would seem to be responsible to protect his customers.� Since this is a business and the victim was a customer, he owes a legal duty to her.

FBI Handbook of Forensic Science

Format: Paperback

Language: English

Format: PDF / Kindle / ePub

Size: 5.52 MB

Downloadable formats: PDF

This overrules the common law position that there was no journalist privilege: Nicholls (1993) 66 A Crim R 517. There is insufficient scrutiny of expert evidence at the admissibility stage, it being rare for evidence to be excluded on reliability grounds96. The representative remarked to a co-worker that Office Jobs, Inc., cannot afford to refer "these drug dealer types" to client companies. The agreement must, in general, be obligatory on both parties, or it binds neither.

Irrefutable Evidence: Adventures in the History of Forensic

Format: Hardcover

Language: English

Format: PDF / Kindle / ePub

Size: 11.92 MB

Downloadable formats: PDF

When dealing with hearsay. a question you should ask is whether it is flexible enough to be able to allow the record of the witnesses statements. there is a record of that testimony and you could admit this through hearsay. All biological evidence should be clearly tagged, marked and packaged. A. § 39-14-118, issuing false financial statement, T. The future should be brighter as the technology improves so that the process of DNA typing will likely become much quicker, less complex, and less expensive.

Making Public Places Safer: Surveillance and Crime

Format: Hardcover

Language: English

Format: PDF / Kindle / ePub

Size: 9.42 MB

Downloadable formats: PDF

The court should call for oral evidence in camera where necessary and should permit crossexamination of any witness or probe validity of objection. Retrieved October 15, 2016, from http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/law-of-evidence/ LÉO Ducharme Revised By James Bowron, R. What emerges here is a familiar difference between two types of instrumentalist theory (see Braithwaite & Pettit 1990: 26–36).

Evidence and Procedures for Boundary Location

Format: Hardcover

Language: English

Format: PDF / Kindle / ePub

Size: 5.15 MB

Downloadable formats: PDF

Anyanwu, "Crime and Justice in Postcolonial Nigeria: The Justifications and Challenges of Islamic Law of Shari 'ah", (2005-2006) 21(2) The Journal of Law and Religion 315 to approx. 348; OGEFERE, A. Some of the ways they do this is by chatting in chat rooms to find local victims, surfing American On-line (AOL) because of the high volume of new users, or random searches leading to the type of victim they are seeking, and finally posts online dating ads that pinpoint a certain type of victim.

Army Tactics, Techniques, and Procedures ATTP 3-39.20 (FM

Format: Paperback

Language: English

Format: PDF / Kindle / ePub

Size: 14.37 MB

Downloadable formats: PDF

And Im not TEENding calls if Treason are calls for violence. How can counsel use pretrial motions to gather information to support the defense in a child sex abuse case? Public officials who claim to exercise powers conferred by legal order often appear to act in ways that we believe violate constraints of legality. Custodial confessions, by virtue of the conditions of police custody and interrogation, necessarily carries a higher risk of false confessions and therefore a higher risk of being tainted with unreliability.

Roscoe's Digest of the law of evidence on the trial of civil

Format: Paperback

Language: English

Format: PDF / Kindle / ePub

Size: 5.25 MB

Downloadable formats: PDF

An arrest occurs when a person is taken into police custody. If the instruction is "explain the circumstances of all charges and convictions," then I'd give may never be charged with a crime. One factor in determining whether a prior restraint should be used is whether it would be effective. Voluntary intoxication does not excuse criminal conduct; however, in limited circumstances, intoxication may negate the necessary state of mind for a given offense and thus prove exculpatory.

Evidence: Impeachment by Evidence of a Criminal Conviction

Format: Print Length

Language: English

Format: PDF / Kindle / ePub

Size: 6.74 MB

Downloadable formats: PDF

Some courts do not follow this rule when it comes to e-mail. Defence Against Culpable Homicide: this describe all the element regarding self Defence and provide very practical description.... If the person cannot be identified or located or does not reside in Canada, the judge may order the custodian of the computer system to post the text of the notice at the location where the material was previously stored and made available, until the time set for the appearance. (4) If the person who posted the material does not appear for the proceedings, the court may proceed ex parte to hear and determine the proceedings in the absence of the person as fully and effectually as if the person had appeared. (5) If the court is satisfied, on a balance of probabilities, that the material is available to the public and is hate propaganda within the meaning of subsection 320(8) or computer data within the meaning of subsection 342.1(2) that makes hate propaganda available, it may order the custodian of the computer system to delete the material. (6) When the court makes the order for the deletion of the material, it may order the destruction of the electronic copy in the court’s possession. (7) If the court is not satisfied that the material is available to the public and is hate propaganda within the meaning of subsection 320(8) or computer data within the meaning of subsection 342.1(2) that makes hate propaganda available, the court shall order that the electronic copy be returned to the custodian and terminate the order under paragraph (1)(b). (8) Subsections 320(6) to (8) apply, with any modifications that the circumstances require, to this section. (9) No order made under subsections (5) to (7) takes effect until the time for final appeal has expired. means paper that is used to make stamps, licences or permits or for any purpose connected with the public revenue. (papier de revenu) 322 (1) Every one commits theft who fraudulently and without colour of right takes, or fraudulently and without colour of right converts to his use or to the use of another person, anything, whether animate or inanimate, with intent (a) to deprive, temporarily or absolutely, the owner of it, or a person who has a special property or interest in it, of the thing or of his property or interest in it; (b) to pledge it or deposit it as security; (c) to part with it under a condition with respect to its return that the person who parts with it may be unable to perform; or (d) to deal with it in such a manner that it cannot be restored in the condition in which it was at the time it was taken or converted. (2) A person commits theft when, with intent to steal anything, he moves it or causes it to move or to be moved, or begins to cause it to become movable. (3) A taking or conversion of anything may be fraudulent notwithstanding that it is effected without secrecy or attempt at concealment. (4) For the purposes of this Act, the question whether anything that is converted is taken for the purpose of conversion, or whether it is, at the time it is converted, in the lawful possession of the person who converts it is not material. (5) For the purposes of this section, a person who has a wild living creature in captivity shall be deemed to have a special property or interest in it while it is in captivity and after it has escaped from captivity. 323 (1) Where oysters and oyster brood are in oyster beds, layings or fisheries that are the property of any person and are sufficiently marked out or known as the property of that person, that person shall be deemed to have a special property or interest in them. (2) An indictment is sufficient if it describes an oyster bed, laying or fishery by name or in any other way, without stating that it is situated in a particular territorial division. 324 Every one who is a bailee of anything that is under lawful seizure by a peace officer or public officer in the execution of the duties of his office, and who is obliged by law or agreement to produce and deliver it to that officer or to another person entitled thereto at a certain time and place, or on demand, steals it if he does not produce and deliver it in accordance with his obligation, but he does not steal it if his failure to produce and deliver it is not the result of a wilful act or omission by him. 325 A factor or an agent does not commit theft by pledging or giving a lien on goods or documents of title to goods that are entrusted to him for the purpose of sale or for any other purpose, if the pledge or lien is for an amount that does not exceed the sum of (a) the amount due to him from his principal at the time the goods or documents are pledged or the lien is given; and (b) the amount of any bill of exchange that he has accepted for or on account of his principal. 326 (1) Every one commits theft who fraudulently, maliciously, or without colour of right, (a) abstracts, consumes or uses electricity or gas or causes it to be wasted or diverted; or (b) uses any telecommunication facility or obtains any telecommunication service. 327 (1) Everyone who, without lawful excuse, makes, possesses, sells, offers for sale, imports, obtains for use, distributes or makes available a device that is designed or adapted primarily to use a telecommunication facility or obtain a telecommunication service without payment of a lawful charge, under circumstances that give rise to a reasonable inference that the device has been used or is or was intended to be used for that purpose, is (a) guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term of not more than two years; or (b) guilty of an offence punishable on summary conviction. (2) If a person is convicted of an offence under subsection (1) or paragraph 326(1) (b), in addition to any punishment that is imposed, any device in relation to which the offence was committed or the possession of which constituted the offence may be ordered forfeited to Her Majesty and may be disposed of as the Attorney General directs. (3) No order for forfeiture is to be made in respect of telecommunication facilities or equipment by means of which an offence under subsection (1) is committed if they are owned by a person engaged in providing a telecommunication service to the public or form part of such a person’s telecommunication service or system and that person is not a party to the offence. (a) a component of a device; and (a) by the owner of it from a person who has a special property or interest in it; (b) by a person who has a special property or interest in it from the owner of it; (c) by a lessee of it from his reversioner; (d) by one of several joint owners, tenants in common or partners of or in it from the other persons who have an interest in it; or (e) by the representatives of an organization from the organization. 330 (1) Every one commits theft who, having received anything from any person on terms that require him to account for or pay it or the proceeds of it or a part of the proceeds to that person or another person, fraudulently fails to account for or pay it or the proceeds of it or the part of the proceeds of it accordingly. (2) Where subsection (1) otherwise applies, but one of the terms is that the thing received or the proceeds or part of the proceeds of it shall be an item in a debtor and creditor account between the person who receives the thing and the person to whom he is to account for or to pay it, and that the latter shall rely only on the liability of the other as his debtor in respect thereof, a proper entry in that account of the thing received or the proceeds or part of the proceeds of it, as the case may be, is a sufficient accounting therefor, and no fraudulent conversion of the thing or the proceeds or part of the proceeds of it thereby accounted for shall be deemed to have taken place. 331 Every one commits theft who, being entrusted, whether solely or jointly with another person, with a power of attorney for the sale, mortgage, pledge or other disposition of real or personal property, fraudulently sells, mortgages, pledges or otherwise disposes of the property or any part of it, or fraudulently converts the proceeds of a sale, mortgage, pledge or other disposition of the property, or any part of the proceeds, to a purpose other than that for which he was entrusted by the power of attorney. 332 (1) Every one commits theft who, having received, either solely or jointly with another person, money or valuable security or a power of attorney for the sale of real or personal property, with a direction that the money or a part of it, or the proceeds or a part of the proceeds of the security or the property shall be applied to a purpose or paid to a person specified in the direction, fraudulently and contrary to the direction applies to any other purpose or pays to any other person the money or proceeds or any part of it. (2) This section does not apply where a person who receives anything mentioned in subsection (1) and the person from whom he receives it deal with each other on such terms that all money paid to the former would, in the absence of any such direction, be properly treated as an item in a debtor and creditor account between them, unless the direction is in writing. 333 No person commits theft by reason only that he takes, for the purpose of exploration or scientific investigation, a specimen of ore or mineral from land that is not enclosed and is not occupied or worked as a mine, quarry or digging. 333.1 (1) Everyone who commits theft is, if the property stolen is a motor vehicle, guilty of an offence and liable (a) on proceedings by way of indictment, to imprisonment for a term of not more than 10 years, and to a minimum punishment of imprisonment for a term of six months in the case of a third or subsequent offence under this subsection; or (b) on summary conviction, to imprisonment for a term of not more than 18 months. (2) For the purpose of determining whether a convicted person has committed a third or subsequent offence, an offence for which the person was previously convicted is considered to be an earlier offence whether it was prosecuted by indictment or by way of summary conviction proceedings. 334 Except where otherwise provided by law, every one who commits theft (a) is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding ten years, where the property stolen is a testamentary instrument or the value of what is stolen exceeds five thousand dollars; or (i) of an indictable offence and is liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years, or (ii) of an offence punishable on summary conviction, where the value of what is stolen does not exceed five thousand dollars. 335 (1) Subject to subsection (1.1), every one who, without the consent of the owner, takes a motor vehicle or vessel with intent to drive, use, navigate or operate it or cause it to be driven, used, navigated or operated, or is an occupant of a motor vehicle or vessel knowing that it was taken without the consent of the owner, is guilty of an offence punishable on summary conviction. (1.1) Subsection (1) does not apply to an occupant of a motor vehicle or vessel who, on becoming aware that it was taken without the consent of the owner, attempted to leave the motor vehicle or vessel, to the extent that it was feasible to do so, or actually left the motor vehicle or vessel. 336 Every one who, being a trustee of anything for the use or benefit, whether in whole or in part, of another person, or for a public or charitable purpose, converts, with intent to defraud and in contravention of his trust, that thing or any part of it to a use that is not authorized by the trust is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding fourteen years. 337 Every one who, being or having been employed in the service of Her Majesty in right of Canada or a province, or in the service of a municipality, and entrusted by virtue of that employment with the receipt, custody, management or control of anything, refuses or fails to deliver it to a person who is authorized to demand it and does demand it is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding fourteen years. 338 (1) Every one who, without the consent of the owner, (a) fraudulently takes, holds, keeps in his possession, conceals, receives, appropriates, purchases or sells cattle that are found astray, or (b) fraudulently, in whole or in part, (i) obliterates, alters or defaces a brand or mark on cattle, or (ii) makes a false or counterfeit brand or mark on cattle, is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding five years. (2) Every one who commits theft of cattle is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding ten years. (3) In any proceedings under this Act, evidence that cattle are marked with a brand or mark that is recorded or registered in accordance with any Act is, in the absence of any evidence to the contrary, proof that the cattle are owned by the registered owner of that brand or mark. (4) Where an accused is charged with an offence under subsection (1) or (2), the burden of proving that the cattle came lawfully into the possession of the accused or his employee or into the possession of another person on behalf of the accused is on the accused, if the accused is not the registered owner of the brand or mark with which the cattle are marked, unless it appears that possession of the cattle by an employee of the accused or by another person on behalf of the accused was without the knowledge and authority, sanction or approval of the accused. 339 (1) Every one is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding five years who, without the consent of the owner, (b) removes, alters, obliterates or defaces a mark or number on, or (c) refuses to deliver up to the owner or to the person in charge thereof on behalf of the owner or to a person authorized by the owner to receive it, any lumber or lumbering equipment that is found adrift, cast ashore or lying on or embedded in the bed or bottom, or on the bank or beach, of a river, stream or lake in Canada, or in the harbours or any of the coastal waters of Canada. (2) Every one who, being a dealer in second-hand goods of any kind, trades or traffics in or has in his possession for sale or traffic any lumbering equipment that is marked with the mark, brand, registered timber mark, name or initials of a person, without the written consent of that person, is guilty of an offence punishable on summary conviction. (3) A peace officer who suspects, on reasonable grounds, that any lumber owned by any person and bearing the registered timber mark of that person is kept or detained in or on any place without the knowledge or consent of that person, may enter into or on that place to ascertain whether or not it is detained there without the knowledge or consent of that person. (4) Where any lumber or lumbering equipment is marked with a timber mark or a boom chain brand registered under any Act, the mark or brand is, in proceedings under subsection (1), and, in the absence of any evidence to the contrary, proof that it is the property of the registered owner of the mark or brand. (5) Where an accused or his servants or agents are in possession of lumber or lumbering equipment marked with the mark, brand, registered timber mark, name or initials of another person, the burden of proving that it came lawfully into his possession or into possession of his servants or agents is, in proceedings under subsection (1), on the accused. (a) a document of title to goods or lands, (b) a valuable security or testamentary instrument, or (c) a judicial or official document, is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding ten years. 341 Every one who, for a fraudulent purpose, takes, obtains, removes or conceals anything is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years. means, in relation to a credit card or credit card data, to sell, export from or import into Canada, distribute or deal with in any other way. (trafic) 342.01 (1) Every person is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term of not more than 10 years, or is guilty of an offence punishable on summary conviction, who, without lawful justification or excuse, makes, repairs, buys, sells, exports from Canada, imports into Canada or possesses any instrument, device, apparatus, material or thing that they know has been used or know is adapted or intended for use (b) in the forging or falsifying of credit cards. (2) Where a person is convicted of an offence under subsection (1), any instrument, device, apparatus, material or thing in relation to which the offence was committed or the possession of which constituted the offence may, in addition to any other punishment that may be imposed, be ordered forfeited to Her Majesty, whereupon it may be disposed of as the Attorney General directs. 342.1 (1) Everyone is guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term of not more than 10 years, or is guilty of an offence punishable on summary conviction who, fraudulently and without colour of right, (b) by means of an electro-magnetic, acoustic, mechanical or other device, intercepts or causes to be intercepted, directly or indirectly, any function of a computer system; (c) uses or causes to be used, directly or indirectly, a computer system with intent to commit an offence under paragraph (a) or (b) or under section 430 in relation to computer data or a computer system; or means, in respect of a computer password, to sell, export from or import into Canada, distribute or deal with in any other way. (trafic) 342.2 (1) Everyone who, without lawful excuse, makes, possesses, sells, offers for sale, imports, obtains for use, distributes or makes available a device that is designed or adapted primarily to commit an offence under section 342.1 or 430, under circumstances that give rise to a reasonable inference that the device has been used or is or was intended to be used to commit such an offence, is (a) guilty of an indictable offence and liable to imprisonment for a term of not more than two years; or (b) guilty of an offence punishable on summary conviction. (2) If a person is convicted of an offence under subsection (1), in addition to any punishment that is imposed, any device in relation to which the offence was committed or the possession of which constituted the offence may be ordered forfeited to Her Majesty and may be disposed of as the Attorney General directs. (a) a component of a device; and (a) steals, and for the purpose of extorting whatever is stolen or to prevent or overcome resistance to the stealing, uses violence or threats of violence to a person or property; (b) steals from any person and, at the time he steals or immediately before or immediately thereafter, wounds, beats, strikes or uses any personal violence to that person; (c) assaults any person with intent to steal from him; or (d) steals from any person while armed with an offensive weapon or imitation thereof. (a) if a restricted firearm or prohibited firearm is used in the commission of the offence or if any firearm is used in the commission of the offence and the offence is committed for the benefit of, at the direction of, or in association with, a criminal organization, to imprisonment for life and to a minimum punishment of imprisonment for a term of (i) in the case of a first offence, five years, and (ii) in the case of a second or subsequent offence, seven years; ( a.1 ) in any other case where a firearm is used in the commission of the offence, to imprisonment for life and to a minimum punishment of imprisonment for a term of four years; and (b) in any other case, to imprisonment for life. (2) In determining, for the purpose of paragraph (1)(a), whether a convicted person has committed a second or subsequent offence, if the person was earlier convicted of any of the following offences, that offence is to be considered as an earlier offence: (a) an offence under this section; (c) an offence under section 220, 236, 239, 272 or 273, subsection 279(1) or section 279.1 or 346 if a firearm was used in the commission of the offence.